Anatomy and physiology of the digestive

The alimentary canal is considered outside of the body because it is open to the external environment at each end mouth, anus. It is the longest section of the alimentary tube, with an average length of 2. Defecation removes indigestible substances from the body so that they do not accumulate inside the gut.

The six primary processes of the digestive system include: Saliva moistens dry food and contains salivary amylase, a digestive enzyme that begins the digestion of carbohydrates.

The alimentary canal wall contains two important intrinsic nerve plexuses- the submucosal nerve plexus and the myenteric nerve plexus, both of which are networks of nerve fibers that are actually part of the autonomic nervous system and help regulate the mobility and secretory activity of the GI tract organs.

On the other hand, propulsion happens within every organ of the alimentary canal.

Lymphatic System

The mucosa of the stomach is a simple columnar epithelium composed entirely of mucous cells that produce a protective layer of bicarbonate-rich alkaline mucus that clings to the stomach mucosa and protects the stomach wall from being damaged by acid and digested by enzymes.

It is located just inferior to the stomach and wraps around the superior and lateral border of the small intestine. The right lymphatic duct drains lymph from the right upper limb and the right side of the head and thorax.

Function of the Digestive System

The teeth are designed for cutting and grinding food into smaller pieces. Segmentation helps to increase the absorption of nutrients by mixing food and increasing its contact with the walls of the intestine.

Large Intestine The large intestine is a long, thick tube about 2. The small intestine is the main absorber, even though the large intestine and stomach also absorb certain substances.

The body is the midportion, and as it narrows inferiorly, it becomes the pyloric antrum, and then the funnel-shaped pylorus. Hanging from the cecum is the wormlike appendix, a potential trouble spot because it is an ideal location for bacteria Anatomy and physiology of the digestive accumulate and multiply.

Swallowing is the process of using smooth and skeletal muscles in the mouth, tongue, and pharynx to push food out of the mouth, through the pharynx, and into the esophagus. Absorption begins in the stomach with simple molecules like water and alcohol being absorbed directly into the bloodstream.

Peristalsis is a muscular wave that travels the length of the GI tract, moving partially digested food a short distance down the tract.

The mucosa of the stomach is thrown into large folds called rugae when it is empty. Learn about them by visiting our section on digestive diseases and conditions.

Liver and Gallbladder The liver is a roughly triangular accessory organ of the digestive system located to the right of the stomach, just inferior to the diaphragm and superior to the small intestine. Inside the mouth are many accessory organs that aid in the digestion of food—the tongue, teeth, and salivary glands.

In contrast, local collections of lymphatic tissue found in the submucosa increase in number toward the end of the small intestine. The mouth and stomach are also responsible for the storage of food as it is waiting to be digested. Within each villus is a rich capillary bed and a modified lymphatic capillary called a lacteal.

The chief cells produce protein-digesting enzymes, mostly pepsinogens. About 25 cm 10 inches long, it is essentially a passageway that conducts food by peristalsis to the stomach.

The lips labia protect its anterior opening. The ascending colon makes a turn and continuous to be the transverse colon as it travels across the abdominal cavity.

Liver and Gallbladder The liver is a roughly triangular accessory organ of the digestive system located to the right of the stomach, just inferior to the diaphragm and superior to the small intestine. In contrast, local collections of lymphatic tissue found in the submucosa increase in number toward the end of the small intestine.

It takes many waves of peristalsis for food to travel from the esophagus, through the stomach and intestinesand reach the end of the GI tract. Lymphatic vessels form a one-way system in which lymph only flows toward the heart.

Finally, bile is used to emulsify large masses of lipids into tiny globules for easy digestion.Popular physiology quizzes: 1 - the nervous system: test your knowledge of nervous system physiology.

2 - the endocrine system: do you understand how it functions?. 3 - the digestive system: learn the physiology of the digestive system.

4 - the integumentary system: Do you know the functions of the skin?. 5 - the circulatory system: How about the operation of the circulatory system? Nov 23,  · Anatomy and Physiology of Digestive System digestive system digestive enzymes human digestive system digestive system diagram digestive system for.

Anatomy and Physiology Quizzes Online Quizzes for CliffsNotes Anatomy and Physiology QuickReview, 2nd Edition; Function of the Digestive System. The function of the digestive system is digestion and absorption. Digestion is the breakdown of food into small molecules, which are then absorbed into the body.

Digestive Enzymes Each is broken down into its molecular components by specific enzymes: Complex carbohydrates, or polysaccharides (such as starches), are broken down into oligosaccharides (consisting of two to ten linked monosaccharides), disaccharides (such as maltose), or individual monosaccharides (such as glucose or fructose).

Nov 23,  · Anatomy and Physiology of Digestive System digestive system digestive enzymes human digestive system digestive system diagram digestive system for kids respiratory. Digestive system: The alimentary canal and accessory digestive organs.

Organs of the digestive system are divided into two main groups: organs within the alimentary canal and accessory digestive organs. The alimentary canal, which is also called the gastrointestinal (GI) tract or gut, is the entire length of tube that winds through the body from the mouth to the anus.

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Anatomy and physiology of the digestive
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